Me — Exhausting Your Music Tastes

I’ve lately been getting burned out on music, which has never happened to me before. Every time I get bored of one band or one genre of music I can always jump onto another thing, be it a new station on the radio or a new artist I haven’t heard much of.

But in the wake of my depression, I overdosed on my “happy, energy-inducing music”, and in order to compensate for that, I put Spotify on the computer I use at work so I can listen to my own playlists, such as my 28 hour long gaming playlist (a good portion of which is Darren Korb from Transistor/Pyre etc, as well as things like the Faster than Light soundtrack and, most recently, the FFVII soundtrack).

The problem with this is that music doesn’t take very long to listen to. If you listened to every officially recorded Beatles song, it would take you about 9 hours, so with a 40 hour work week you’d be done Tuesday morning, and unless you’re prepared to start the next Beatlemania, you’re going to have to find something new pretty quick.

And so, where do you find new, good music? I’m not looking, per se, I’m just finding it interesting that I feel burnt out on everything. All my modern pop rock stuff is exhausting, my chill video game music is diverse and confusing as far as mood goes (I mean, just in FFVII alone you can go from Costa del Sol to One Winged Angel in a heartbeat).

At home I don’t listen to music a whole lot, because if I have any amount of actual free time I’m probably watching either Day9 or Critical Role. If I am listening to music, it’s probably a YouTube playlist of lo-fi music, which I recently discovered. I love the chill, hip-hop beats, but I don’t want to bring it to work because my production manager would hate it and I also don’t want to ruin this genre for myself as well. It’s funny, because picking the day’s music has slowly become a game of “what songs will I hate the least“. Having recently watched Yesterday, I’m going with Beatlemania II: Beatlmanier.

(It is also at this moment where I realized I should have just written a review post of Yesterday. I have quite a bit more to say about it. But I’m already this far in,  and this post is already a day late, so whatever.)

Is this why people ask for music suggestions on social media? Because they’ve exhausted their personal library of stuff they enjoy? I feel like all I really need is to take a break from music altogether, but working in silence day-to-day would be far, far worse. In addition to that, the only music sources I really have access to there are Pandora (which sucks, because it’s radio library is tiny, and it will occasionally play the same song twice in a row!) and Spotify, which is much better, but difficult to find good radios, because everything is a playlist and people’s preference of music are not my preferences of music.

When I’m no longer working at my current job I’m going to get back into podcasts. I’ve got over a year of stuff to catch up on!

Review — Jukebox the Ghost

I really don’t talk about music often. For the most part, I just have a list of three hundred (ish) songs that I play on shuffle, with wildly different genres mixed in. When I’m not listening to that playlist I’m listening to podcasts or just straight video game soundtracks (as in literally a three hour YouTube video of title song to credits song).

But some time ago, a friend of mine showed me a new band. This wasn’t irregular for him, he always has a new band for me to listen to. It’s mostly garbage, I don’t know how he calls half his playlist music, but the most recent time we hung out he introduced me to Jukebox the Ghost. It got me thinking: how often do people genuinely listen to and appreciate others’ music? I’m certainly not the type to enjoy anything except for the stuff I already have.

And yet, I’ve listened to Jukebox the Ghost almost exclusively for about a month straight. With no sign of stopping, even. I tried listening to my old playlist, and thought about adding some JtG songs to it, but then I thought, “Nah, that would make me hear less of these new songs.”

So, enough of the backstory. Now for the review from the guy that has no idea what he’s talking about.

According to Wikipedia, Jukebox the Ghost is an indie pop/rock band from the most recent decade. It’s a piano-centric band with clear and energetic vocals. In brief, I would say they are a new-age Billy Joel, if he was trying to be Queen at the same time. Maybe the other way around, as the case may be in some songs. On the JtG Pandora station at my work, it also plays lots of Mika (whom I have never heard of and still have no interest in), Death Cab for Cutie (whom I can enjoy), and some late 90’s to 00’s alternative classics (which I am also fond of). This also proves that Spotify is a better radio—I don’t have to listen to stuff I don’t want to, I can just listen to Jukebox.

The weirdest thing that happened with my exposure to this band was that I only liked about three songs when I started listening to them, and as soon as I was apathetic enough to leave others on, I started liking them, too. Now I really like basically all of their stuff, save for a few strange exceptions. I don’t like any of their slow, quiet stuff, because as far as Mood-congruence theory goes, it’s off-putting. I don’t want to feel happy listening to energetic songs and then suddenly have a slow, quiet piano for three or four minutes. I’m sure I’d enjoy those songs in a different mood, but that mood would basically require me not to be listening to that band. (It’s worth noting that they have a Solo Piano version of a lot of their songs, and I hate all of these versions for the same reason.)

They’re a good band. They might have even hit my Top 3 Favorites already. They still have weird things that I don’t like (in a few of their songs, they have Buddy Holly-esque ‘hiccups’ I don’t care for), but overall they know what they’re doing. I don’t have a favorite song exactly, but “Adulthood” is a strong contender.